Wednesday, January 27, 2010

Worse than Thalidomide [Serge]

Two weeks ago the UK government issued a formal apology for the thalidomide disaster. Fifty years ago, some pregnant women in the UK were given Thalidomide in order to treat morning sickness. It was effective in treating the mother's symptoms, but we soon discovered that it had horrible effects on the mothers' unborn child. About 10,000 children were harmed while in the womb, resulting in a number of children born without limbs. There are about 400 "Thalidomiders" still alive today.

This was a true tragedy, and you may think that it could not happen today. You would be very wrong. What happens today is far worse.

Thalidomide accidentally caused harm to 10,000 unborn children. However, the UK as well as the US presently approves a medication that intentionally kills millions of unborn children. That medication is mifiprex or RU-486. Unlike thalidomide, the only reason that mifiprex is given is to intentionally kill an unborn child. If the unborn child survives after a woman takes mifiprex, it is considered a failure of the medication.

What does it say about our culture that we issue apologies for harming children in the past at the same time we market a medication that intentionally kills children? Instead of harming children, what if thalidomide was more effective in killing them? Would we still apologize?


2 comments:

  1. Great comment. You are all probably familiar with Tony Melendez, but he is one of the "Thalidomiders" that you are referencing. He has no arms, but has a musical ministry and plays the guitar with his feet. He travels around the world illustrating the Sanctity of Life, and has even played for the Pope on several occasions.

    We were fortunate to have Tony play a free concert at our church the day after the National March in DC. You can see the entire concert online at http://www.livinghopeforlife.org/tonymelendez2010.html.

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